Brexit EU Citizens Resident Applications in the UK Rejection Rate

Post Brexit Referendum EU Resident Applications Rejection Rates

28% Residents Applications in the UK by EU Citizens Refused

This post relates to the Rejection Rate of the settlement applications made by EU Citizens resident in the UK after the Brexit Referendum and covers the following topics:

  • A) Post Brexit Referendum | EU Citizens Rejection Rate;
    1. Estimates | Applications from 800,000 EU Citizens Might be Rejected!;
    2. Last Two (2) Quarters Rejection Rate | 28% Applications Refused and Declared Invalid;
    3. Not Appropriate to Draw Conclusions Regarding Reasons for Refusals;
    4. Settlement of EU Citizens in the UK is a Priority of the Government;
  • B) Likely Cut-off Date;
    1. EU Citizens Post Brexit Rights;
    2. Freedom of Movement and Dramatic Fall in Immigration;
  • C) Consultation with Businesses;
    1. Points-Based System;
    2. It will take years to replace EU Staff | UK Businesses and NHS;
    3. Post-Brexit Immigration System to enable Business to Thrive;
  • D) House of Lords to Amend the Article 50 Bill;
  • E) No Guarantees to EU Citizens is Unacceptable;

UK Visa Blog Immigration, Settlement, Refusal, Appeal Solicitors

A) Post Brexit Referendum | EU Citizens Rejection Rate

According to latest official statistics, more than a quarter (25%) of applications made by EU citizens resident in the UK for permanent residency in the UK have been rejected since Britain has voted to leave the European Union.

1. Estimates | Applications from 800,000 EU Citizens Might be Rejected!

If the government was to require all EU citizens to apply for permanent residency, the refusal rate could mean eight hundred thousand (800,000) EU citizens are left without an absolute certainty as to whether they could be staying in the UK after Brexit.

2. Last Two (2) Quarters Rejection Rate | 28% Applications Refused and Declared Invalid

In the last two (2) quarters of 2016, permanent residency applications of more than twelve thousand eight hundred (12,800) EU citizens have been refused. Moreover,  as many as fifty-five hundred (5,500) permanent residency applications have been declared invalid. Therefore, the rejection rate is estimated to be 28%. Here it is important to note, that for qualifying for permanent resident, EU nationals are required to have five years (5) continued residence in the United Kingdom.

3. Not Appropriate to Draw Conclusions Regarding Reasons for Refusals

The rejection rates include applications that were invalid due to either errors or unpaid fees. Therefore, it is not suitable to draw inferences about the reasons for the rejections of the applications made by EU Citizens in the UK.

4. Settlement of EU Citizens in the UK is a Priority of the Government

According to the Home Office, refusal rates have not changed over the last year. And the European citizens resident in the UK makes a vital contribution both to the UK’s economy and society. Therefore, the Home Office is committed to secure the status of EU Citizens resident in the UK on a priority basis. This is supported by the fact that more than a million British nationals are living in the EU, and the British Government would be keen that they should also be given a priority treatment after triggering of article 50.

It is crucial to note that as long as Britain is a member of EU,  the EEA nationals are neither required to apply to the Home Office for documentation confirming their status nor their rights in the UK will change.

B) Likely Cut-off Date

The day on which the British PM Theresa May will trigger article 50 next month (March 2017) is described as the most likely cut-off date. Afterwards, the EU citizens will no longer have the automatic right to live in the United Kingdom. Nevertheless, PM Theresa May is quite prepared to guarantee that EU Citizens residing in the UK before the cut-off date will be protected, provided that UK citizens in EU have similar reciprocal rights.

Depending on the result of the struggle between  House of Lords and the House of Commons before the article 50 bill receives a royal assent, the PM Theresa May is expected to meet her self-imposed end of March 2017 deadline for triggering the formal two (2) year process for leaving the EU.

It is reasoned that the government could be at risk of a legal challenge if PM Theresa May attempts to make 23 June 2016, i.e. the referendum date, the cut-off date.

1. EU Citizens Post Brexit Rights

According to the Media Report, the British Government, in addition to the Cut-off Date, has yet to say anything conclusive regarding the Right of EU Citizens after Brexit.

2. Freedom of Movement and Dramatic Fall in Immigration

Although, despite the repeated pledge of the British Government that it is resolved to end freedom of movement, it is not expecting that immigration will fall dramatically immediately after Britain leaves the EU.

The latest quarterly migration statistics released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) pointed that the number of EU citizens in Britain who had submitted permanent resident applications for living in the UK has increased.

The British Government is against cliff edges when it comes to reducing immigration. It is considering a five-year working visa. The holders would be not be allowed to claim benefits.

The home office has been reported to consider a permit system, which is one of a number of options available. In work permit system the government would be able to control the number of EU citizens who could enter Britain every year for taking up a job offer with a British company.

C) Consultation with Businesses

The government is likely to consult businesses over its plans for an immigration system in the mid of 2017 and is looking at all sets of different alternatives.

1. Points-Based System

The PM Theresa May has nearly ruled out a points-based system, which has been the asserted preferred option of the Vote Leave campaigners.

2. It will take years to replace EU Staff | UK Businesses and NHS

Last week while visiting Estonia, David Davis has stated that it will take years and years for the NHS and UK businesses to replace EU staff in areas such as social care and hospitality industry. He further on adding that one can’t expect just because changing who makes the policy decisions, the door will suddenly be shut: it won’t.

3. Post-Brexit Immigration System to enable Business to Thrive

The Government Ministers are highlighting the fact that the government is going to work with businesses, with employers, so as to make sure that the post-Brexit immigration system enables businesses to continue to thrive and grow. Nevertheless, the government is still committed to reducing numbers.

D) House of Lords to Amend the Article 50 Bill

The House of Lords is likely to support amendments to the Article 50 bill during the week that would guarantee rights to EU nationals, with the help from Liberal Democrat, Labour, and crossbench peers. More than eighty (80) peers across the parties voiced concern for the rights of EU citizens over the course of the two (2) day debate at the bill’s second reading in the House of Lords.

E) No Guarantees to EU Citizens is Unacceptable

The Lib Dem has stated that the no guarantees to EU Citizens about their future are unacceptable. And the PM has a responsibility to provide certainty to the EU citizens, who work in British hospitals, schools, care homes, and factories.

The Lib-Dems are further of the opinion that Government’s proposed consultations with the business during the summers of 2017 are not good enough. It is rather disgraceful to leave people in limbo till then, which is a quite shameful for the government.

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